Thiuram Mix Allergy Facts

This is a compilation of information from TrueTest.com, Contact Allergy Database, DermNetnz.org and U.S. National Library of Medicine. This information may not be complete, check with your doctor if you have further questions.

What is Thiuram Mix?

Thiuram Mix is a mix of four chemicals used to detect an allergy to rubber products. It can also be used as an antimicrobial in some personal skin care products. These substances are used as fungicides and pesticides and in the manufacture of many rubber products. It may take two to three weeks of avoiding exposure before improvement of an eruption begins.

Thiuram Mix contains the following four substances:

  • Dipentamethylenethiuram disulfide
  • Disulfiram (tetraethylthiuram disulfide)
  • Tetramethylthiuram disulfide
  • Tetramethylthiuram monosulfide

Individuals with certain medical conditions, such as: Chronic respiratory, and skin diseases, are at increased risk from exposure to thiuram mix.

How To Avoid Thiuram Mix
  • Avoid direct skin contact with rubber products in your car, at work and at home.

  • Use only products that do not list thiuram mix, one of its components or related chemicals on the label, ingredient list or Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS).

  • Use rubber-free alternatives made of plastic, leather, wood, fabric. or vinyl (such as, heavy duty nonrubber gloves (SmartPractice® Heavy Duty vinyl or Silvershield®/4H® gloves)) when working with chemicals that might contain thiuram mix or one of its components.

  • Be suspicious of any product containing rubber, which seems to cause a rash where it touches your skin, such as underwear, bras, girdles, support stockings, etc.

  • Be aware that if your spouse or significant other uses topical skincare products that contain this chemical, composite transfer may occur to you.

  • Tell your physician, pharmacist, dentist, veterinarian, beautician and hairdresser that you are allergic to thiuram mix, which is often used in rubber products. Ask for rubber products that do not contain thiuram mix or related substances.

  • If you think that you contact thiuram mix or one of its components at work, ask your employer for MSDS or manufacturer information on the product(s). Wear protective clothing when handling items such as rubber hoses, seals and cables. Talk to your employer about using a different product.

Other names for Thiuram Mix to Look For and Avoid

Avoid products with thiurams of the following names in the list of ingredients, Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), or package insert.Avoid products with thiurams of the following names in the list of ingredients, Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), or package insert:

  • Dipentamethylenethiuramdisulfide or disulfide, bis(1-piperidinylthioxomethyl): bis(pentamethylene)thiruam disulfide: 1,1′-(dithiodicarbonothioyl)bispiperidineIf your skin is regularly exposed to rubber, you may develop reactions to other substances commonly used in the manufacture of rubber such as mercaptobenzothiazoles, mercapto mix and thioureas
  • Disulfiram or 1,1′-dithiobis(N,N-diethylthioformamide); bis(N,N-diethylthiocarbamoly) disulfide; tetraethylthiuram disulfide; tetraethylthioperoxydicarbonic diamide
  • Tetramethylthiuramdisulfide or thiram; bis(dimethyl thiocarbamoyl)disulfide; tetramethlthioperoxydicarbonic diamide; N,N’-(dithiodicarbonothioyl)bis(N-methylmethanamine); tetramethylthiocarbamoyldisulphide
  • Tetramethylthiurammonosulfide or bis(dimethylthiocarbamol) sulfide; tetramethylthiuram sulfide; tetramethyldithiocarbamic acid anhydrosulfide; sulfide, bis(dimethylthiocarbamoyl)
What products contain Thiuram Mix or one of its components?*

Adhesives – glue, paste, art supplies, glue pens
Agricultural insecticides
Anesthesia
Antabuse (Disulfiram)
Aprons
ATM machine buttons made of rubber
Balloons
Bath mats and floor rugs that have rubber backing
Bed sheeting
Boots
Bug repellants
Cables
Car races that give off tire and rubber particles
Caulking
Chair pads
Commercial detergents
Condoms
Dental dams
Diaphragms
Disinfectants
Earphones
Elastic – undergarments, socks, and other clothing with elastic
Electrical cords & plugs
Equipment
Erasers
Fungicides
Gloves
Goggles
Grocery store checkout belts
Handles
Headphones
Hoses
Insulation
Makeup sponges
Masks
Mats
Mattresses
Medical and utility gloves and tubing
Medical devices
Mildew or mold preventatives
Mouse and wrist pads
Paint and Glue removers
Paints
Pens with comfort grip or any rubber coating
Pesticides
Remote controllers for TVs or recording devices with rubber grips or keys
Renal dialysis equipment
Respirators
Restaurants where workers use latex gloves to prepare food
Rubber
Rubber bands
Rubber eyelash curler
Rubber in clothing, safety goggles
Rubber or rubber-grip utensils
Rubber pillows
Rubber sheets
Rubber sink stoppers and sink mats
Rubber Stamps
Seed protectants and pesticides
Shampoo
Sheeting
Shoes
Soap
Sports equipment handles
Swimwear
Tennis racquets
TETD
Tire tubes
Tires
Tools with rubber grips
Toothbrushes and other items with rubber grips or handles
Toys
Tubing
Utility gloves
Wetsuits

* This list may not be all-inclusive. Read product labels carefully and talk to your doctor if you have any questions. Product formulations may change from time to time without notice. Talk to your doctor for specific instructions. For additional information about products that might contain thiuram mix or a related substance, go to the Household Products Database online (householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov) at the United States National Library of Medicine.

Products That May NOT Contain Thiuram Mix?*

Products made entirely of:

Acrylates
Plastic
Ployethylene
Polyurethane
Silicone
VinylProducts made entirely of:
Acrylates
Plastic
Ployethylene
Polyurethane
Silicone
Vinyl

* This list may not be all-inclusive. Read product labels carefully and talk to your doctor if you have any questions. Product formulations may change from time to time without notice. Talk to your doctor for specific instructions. For additional information about products that might contain thiruam mix or a related substance, go to the Household Products Database online (householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov) at the United States National Library of Medicine

Nancy’s Personal Experience

Avoiding all the items on the list is daunting and has been life altering. I find all the new terminology challenging. My physician, pharmacist, dentist, veterinarian, didn’t have a clue what thiuram mix is or how to deal with it. I am finding I have to educate the professionals about this, which surprises me. Wearing white gloves are my new fashion statement. I feel like I am channeling Michael Jackson with one glove on half of the time.

My dermatologist has informed me this is not a latex allergy, but thiuram mix is often in latex gloves and is in the nitrate glove alternative. Getting the Materials Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) can prove problematic. Not every company is willing to provide it. Responses from companies I have heard: “That is proprietary information.” Or “Our company is not required to have that.” Without the MSDS it is challenging, if not impossible, to determine if a vinyl, silicone, or polyurethane, polyethylene or acrylates are thiuram mix free. So I am avoiding them.

 

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For allergy emergencies call 911 or visit your nearest hospital.